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Jason

Happy Reformation Day! 500th Anniversary!

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500 years ago today Martin Luther nailed his 95 theses (dealing with indulgences) to the door of the castle church in Wittenberg.  Because the printing press had been recently invented his theses spread like wildfire and a reformation was sparked returning the true Gospel of Jesus Christ to man.

 

 

Luther95theses.jpg

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The catholic church probably is not celebrating....

 

You can probably thank his students for translating to the common vernacular though.   Ol' luthar was totally cool with staying with the church, just a few disagreements.

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Didn't this take place well after the several Council of Dicks where the Vatican heavily edited the Bible, rewriting or removing anything they didn't like? From what I've read, between that & the translation through several not necessarily compatible languages, what we have now may be entirely unlike the "original" - in itself an anthology of stories written by different people over centuries.  I'm fascinated by how such a garbled and often self-contradictory book is touted as the singular guide to life for so many people, most of whom have never read more than a fraction of it. 

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There is no Luther without this guy. Jan Hus is considered the first Reformationist and greatly influenced Luther and others. Ran afoul of the church in 1415 and burnt at the stake for his efforts. He also standardized the Czech alphabet. I also find it deliciously ironic that the Czech Republic is now (widely considered) the most atheistic country on earth... 

JanHus.JPG

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8 hours ago, Ben said:

The catholic church probably is not celebrating....

 

You can probably thank his students for translating to the common vernacular though.   Ol' luthar was totally cool with staying with the church, just a few disagreements.

At first, yes, Luther just wanted to "fix" the Catholic church. But they were unwilling.

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6 hours ago, T-Dub said:

Didn't this take place well after the several Council of Dicks where the Vatican heavily edited the Bible, rewriting or removing anything they didn't like? From what I've read, between that & the translation through several not necessarily compatible languages, what we have now may be entirely unlike the "original" - in itself an anthology of stories written by different people over centuries.  I'm fascinated by how such a garbled and often self-contradictory book is touted as the singular guide to life for so many people, most of whom have never read more than a fraction of it. 

No, the Catholic church did not edit the bible.  They had a bible in Latin that hardly anyone could read anyway.  And the bible we have today was not translated several times.  Every modern translation is a direct translation from the original Greek and Hebrew texts.  Yes, written by several different human authors over many centuries, but no contradictions.  

 

How many times have you read it?  It is neither garbled, nor self-contradictory.

 

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2 hours ago, Jason said:

No, the Catholic church did not edit the bible.  They had a bible in Latin that hardly anyone could read anyway.  And the bible we have today was not translated several times.  Every modern translation is a direct translation from the original Greek and Hebrew texts.  Yes, written by several different human authors over many centuries, but no contradictions.  

 

How many times have you read it?  It is neither garbled, nor self-contradictory.

 

1

1. :24:

2. Multiple times, which was a contributing factor in my becoming atheist. 

3. **Edit** Never mind. My days of arguing with the religiously indoctrinated are over...

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1 hour ago, Elflocko said:

1. :24:

2. Multiple times, which was a contributing factor in my becoming atheist. 

3. **Edit** Never mind. My days of arguing with the religiously indoctrinated are over...

Not religiously indoctrinated but regenerated. I'll pray for you.   

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58 minutes ago, Homer_Rice said:

I'll pray for you, too, ElFlocko.

  Hide contents

The Serenity prayer.

 

 

:lol: Well played... 

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6 hours ago, Jason said:

How many times have you read it?  It is neither garbled, nor self-contradictory.

 

You only have to read the first two chapters to find a contradiction.

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13 hours ago, Jason said:

No, the Catholic church did not edit the bible.  They had a bible in Latin that hardly anyone could read anyway.  And the bible we have today was not translated several times.  Every modern translation is a direct translation from the original Greek and Hebrew texts.  Yes, written by several different human authors over many centuries, but no contradictions.  

 

How many times have you read it?  It is neither garbled, nor self-contradictory.

 

 

I was thinking of the Council of Trent specifically, but I read that it was actually a response to Luther & the reformation. Apparently he included the Old Testament apocrypha & the Catholics did not. Inclusion of the various apocrypha from both the Old & New Testament seems to vary quite a bit from church to church.  I don't know what you call that but editing. I would guess "The Infancy Gospel of Thomas" is the best known of these, but still obscure.  I'm reading that one particular story, of child Jesus breathing life into clay birds, also appears in the Quran.  That's an interesting coincidence for something that's not in most Bibles. 

 

As for the language, was any of it written in Greek?  I think that was a translation, and though I don't know the language I've also read that the ancient Hebrew & Aramaic that it was written in, when translated to Ancient Greek & then other languages (ending much later in English, obviously) loses quite a bit of meaning.  The most notable mistake in translation that I've read about suggests that pronouns weren't handled the same way, so for example the first-person singular gets confused with the first-person plural. "I am" becomes "We are" - I would say this is important, since it's always the disciples claiming he is the Son of God rather than Christ himself, and they couldn't even play nice among each other... not to mention what the relation was between Jesus and John the Baptist (another point of contention that varies from one Bible to the next).   

 

Anyway, all that aside it doesn't take much digging to learn that there are a lot of different versions of the Bible.  Maybe one of them even explains WTF is going on with Ezekiel between the UFO freak-out and the donkey dicks in 23:20.  

 

 

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On 10/31/2017 at 6:56 AM, Jason said:

500 years ago today Martin Luther nailed his 95 theses (dealing with indulgences) to the door of the castle church in Wittenberg.  Because the printing press had been recently invented his theses spread like wildfire and a reformation was sparked returning the true Gospel of Jesus Christ to man.

 

 

Luther95theses.jpg

 

Dilly! Dilly!

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I spent last Sunday afternoon watching this instead of the Bengals at my local movie theater. Martin Luther was an incredible man. 

 

He wrote the beautiful song, A Mighty Fortress is Our God!

 

1 A mighty fortress is our God,
a bulwark never failing;
our helper he, amid the flood
of mortal ills prevailing.
For still our ancient foe
does seek to work us woe;
his craft and power are great,
and armed with cruel hate,
on earth is not his equal.

2 Did we in our own strength confide,
our striving would be losing,
were not the right Man on our side,
the Man of God's own choosing.
You ask who that may be?
Christ Jesus, it is he;
Lord Sabaoth his name,
from age to age the same;
and he must win the battle.

3 And though this world, with devils filled,
should threaten to undo us,
we will not fear, for God has willed
his truth to triumph through us.
The prince of darkness grim,
we tremble not for him;
his rage we can endure,
for lo! his doom is sure;
one little word shall fell him.

4 That Word above all earthly powers
no thanks to them abideth;
the Spirit and the gifts are ours
through him who with us sideth.
Let goods and kindred go,
this mortal life also;
the body they may kill:
God's truth abideth still;
his kingdom is forever! 

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Because it was the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, all of Germany had a holiday of it.  Normally, the non-Catholic parts get Reformation Day off (31st of October), and the Catholic bits get All Saints Day off (November 1st). 

 

I spent these days snorkeling, being warm, and visiting Buddhist Temples in Thailand.  Thanks, Professor Luther!

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, CincyInDC said:

Because it was the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, all of Germany had a holiday of it.  Normally, the non-Catholic parts get Reformation Day off (31st of October), and the Catholic bits get All Saints Day off (November 1st). 

 

I spent these days snorkeling, being warm, and visiting Buddhist Temples in Thailand.  Thanks, Professor Luther!

 

 

 

 

 

Heretic!

 

:ninja:

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