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A few more Athletic story tidbits:

 

Practice comparison

I received more than a handful of tweets and even some comments at practice that centered around the Bengals’ practice habits as compared to the Detroit Lions. The feeling after day one was that the Lions went too easy and worked on more stretching and practice habits than they did actual football. It was the Bengals practice that displayed the players in more one-on-one situations and gave scouts the eye candy they came for.

It wasn’t until days two and three that the Lions began to ramp up the intensity and speed of their practices. It felt like they established how to practice on day one and then practiced with intent on the following days. There was no wasted time or space when watching their units work.

The Bengals’ practices seemed to keep the same pace and design for much of the week, but people around me started to notice how often position groups were standing around, drinking water and waiting for another portion of practice to finish. In a game where each team is guaranteed to kick off just once, the Bengals spent a considerable amount of time practicing it.

 

Turner classic

I have to admit, I wasn’t a big fan of the hiring of offensive line coach Jim Turner last offseason. With his history of being rough around the edges, I wasn’t sure he was the guy who fit Taylor’s “culture.” Then, they got the running game fixed and the offensive line played better down the stretch and Turner was able to step off the hot seat for Bengals fans.

At practice this week, Turner was the most entertaining coach. We knew he was going to be loud and raw, but it gave us a chance to hear what he was teaching his players. It felt like Turner was going to blow up after day one. He ended the practice with a quick coaching session on how to line up and how to know where your target is going. He was very clear and concise and didn’t leave anything up for debate.

“Is anybody here confused about any of this? No? Then go home.” Turner walked away and left his players to the media. Some seemed shell-shocked and others inspired. Maybe they didn’t know what to expect, but many had a rough first day.

Turner seemed to take a liking to St. John’s offensive tackle Ben Bartch. A Division III player at the Senior Bowl can go one of two ways – he’s either completely outmatched or he surprises everyone and gets loads of praise. Bartch won the first two days and seemed to respond to everything Turner was correcting. The small-school prospect already had great hands, but Turner wanted him to control his base, not get his feet too wide or too narrow and drive with the correct step in run blocking. With each tip, Bartch corrected himself and “GOOD, BARTCH!” boomed from Turner.

This wasn’t the case for everyone. Kentucky’s Logan Stenberg received plenty of fire for his inability to lower his pads and gain leverage. Even when Stenberg seemed to win a rep and jumped on the defender who failed to land his bull rush, Turner replied with, “They’re (pointing at the scouts) not impressed with that Mickey Mouse shit. They came here to see you use your hands and block. Be an athlete.”

Even with the toughness of Turner, he ended the last day of practice with some words of encouragement when talking to his linemen.

“You need to play with confidence,” he told them. “Forget the bad plays and move on. So what, you lost a rep? That’s life. You move on and try to win the next one. You think there’s a lineman in the NFL that didn’t give up a sack? There isn’t one. It happens. You need to get back up and win the next one. I want you guys to go out there and compete and earn your draft position.”

Right after that, I asked LSU center Lloyd Cushenberry about being coached by Turner and if that’s the type of raw style he liked.

“Love it,” Cushenberry said. “He’s a good coach. Hard-nosed. That’s how I’m used to being coached.”

A little tough love seemed to be appreciated by the biggest men on the field.

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There is an interesting legal case here in Ohio, which was recently decided. Coming out of St Mary's HS, it involved questions as to whether badgering insults by coaches on the practice field--specifically the word "pussy"--constituted Title IX violations, and thus discriminatory actions. 

 

The plaintiffs lost the decision, however I could not help but think of Bully Boy while reading it. 

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1 hour ago, Le Tigre said:

There is an interesting legal case here in Ohio, which was recently decided. Coming out of St Mary's HS, it involved questions as to whether badgering insults by coaches on the practice field--specifically the word "pussy"--constituted Title IX violations, and thus discriminatory actions. 

 

The plaintiffs lost the decision, however I could not help but think of Bully Boy while reading it. 

I am not a Turner fan but I doubt if there is a player in the USA that has not been called a "pussy" at least once in their football career from grade school on up.

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Was called much worse in my day...but the case was interesting, in that it illustrates the genesis in the realm of verbal/physical abuse, from anything goes to watch your step. 
 

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28 minutes ago, Le Tigre said:

Was called much worse in my day...but the case was interesting, in that it illustrates the genesis in the realm of verbal/physical abuse, from anything goes to watch your step. 
 

Yeah, I just think it’s social and human progression, people are generally tired of being denigrated, regardless of the circumstances. Can’t say I’m not one of them. Fear and fire and brimstone were never effective motivators to me, even when I was a younger man. I don’t think they are all that effective anymore.

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23 hours ago, bfine said:

Simply providing an example of a player that would cost and 1/3 of what Hart would and could be just as valuable. For folks that take any stock in PFF; Ced's 67 would have been the highest on our team. I want no part of either as a starter and think it might come down to a battle between Johnson and Glenn for the starting RT gig

He played only 14% of the offensive snaps and hardly ANY snaps the last few games.  His last 5 games he had 2, 0, 4, 1  and  2  offensive snaps.  His PFF ranking is meaningless because the sample size is non-existent.  I don't care if he is free, he is so bad he can't get PT on Jacksonville's shitty line.   He had 155 total snaps this year, Hart had 1086.  Hart is by far the better player which means Ced is GARBAGE.  Not even backup worthy. 

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1 hour ago, westside bengal said:

I am not a Turner fan but I doubt if there is a player in the USA that has not been called a "pussy" at least once in their football career from grade school on up.

My favorite was a player on our team was getting shit from the coach: names changed

 

Coach:  "SMITH!!,  you just got beat by Jones!!!"

Jones:  (starts smiling)

Coach:  "And everyone knows Jones sucks!!" 

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1 hour ago, thezerawkid said:

Yeah, I just think it’s social and human progression, people are generally tired of being denigrated, regardless of the circumstances. Can’t say I’m not one of them. Fear and fire and brimstone were never effective motivators to me, even when I was a younger man. I don’t think they are all that effective anymore.

Problem is, this things are like pendulums in that the swing from one extreme to another. From berating and abuse to love and cuddles and everyone's a winner. 

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1 hour ago, SF2 said:

He played only 14% of the offensive snaps and hardly ANY snaps the last few games.  His last 5 games he had 2, 0, 4, 1  and  2  offensive snaps.  His PFF ranking is meaningless because the sample size is non-existent.  I don't care if he is free, he is so bad he can't get PT on Jacksonville's shitty line.   He had 155 total snaps this year, Hart had 1086.  Hart is by far the better player which means Ced is GARBAGE.  Not even backup worthy. 

Okey Dokey

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4 hours ago, thezerawkid said:

Yeah, I just think it’s social and human progression, people are generally tired of being denigrated, regardless of the circumstances. Can’t say I’m not one of them. Fear and fire and brimstone were never effective motivators to me, even when I was a younger man. I don’t think they are all that effective anymore.

 

Well said.

 

2 hours ago, I_C_Deadpeople said:

 to love and cuddles and everyone's a winner. 

 

Honestly the only coaches I've actually seen operate this way are dealing with kids around 6-7 years old or younger.  I don't see anything wrong with prioritizing positive encouragement and values like good sportsmanship over a win-at-all-coats philosophy in the Milford PeeWee T-ball Association.  Maybe teaching kids that there are more important things than winning at sports is in fact a great idea? Think of it as one less potential Steeler or Pats fan.

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10 hours ago, I_C_Deadpeople said:

A few more Athletic story tidbits:

 

Practice comparison

I received more than a handful of tweets and even some comments at practice that centered around the Bengals’ practice habits as compared to the Detroit Lions. The feeling after day one was that the Lions went too easy and worked on more stretching and practice habits than they did actual football. It was the Bengals practice that displayed the players in more one-on-one situations and gave scouts the eye candy they came for.

It wasn’t until days two and three that the Lions began to ramp up the intensity and speed of their practices. It felt like they established how to practice on day one and then practiced with intent on the following days. There was no wasted time or space when watching their units work.

The Bengals’ practices seemed to keep the same pace and design for much of the week, but people around me started to notice how often position groups were standing around, drinking water and waiting for another portion of practice to finish. In a game where each team is guaranteed to kick off just once, the Bengals spent a considerable amount of time practicing it.

 

Turner classic

I have to admit, I wasn’t a big fan of the hiring of offensive line coach Jim Turner last offseason. With his history of being rough around the edges, I wasn’t sure he was the guy who fit Taylor’s “culture.” Then, they got the running game fixed and the offensive line played better down the stretch and Turner was able to step off the hot seat for Bengals fans.

At practice this week, Turner was the most entertaining coach. We knew he was going to be loud and raw, but it gave us a chance to hear what he was teaching his players. It felt like Turner was going to blow up after day one. He ended the practice with a quick coaching session on how to line up and how to know where your target is going. He was very clear and concise and didn’t leave anything up for debate.

“Is anybody here confused about any of this? No? Then go home.” Turner walked away and left his players to the media. Some seemed shell-shocked and others inspired. Maybe they didn’t know what to expect, but many had a rough first day.

Turner seemed to take a liking to St. John’s offensive tackle Ben Bartch. A Division III player at the Senior Bowl can go one of two ways – he’s either completely outmatched or he surprises everyone and gets loads of praise. Bartch won the first two days and seemed to respond to everything Turner was correcting. The small-school prospect already had great hands, but Turner wanted him to control his base, not get his feet too wide or too narrow and drive with the correct step in run blocking. With each tip, Bartch corrected himself and “GOOD, BARTCH!” boomed from Turner.

This wasn’t the case for everyone. Kentucky’s Logan Stenberg received plenty of fire for his inability to lower his pads and gain leverage. Even when Stenberg seemed to win a rep and jumped on the defender who failed to land his bull rush, Turner replied with, “They’re (pointing at the scouts) not impressed with that Mickey Mouse shit. They came here to see you use your hands and block. Be an athlete.”

Even with the toughness of Turner, he ended the last day of practice with some words of encouragement when talking to his linemen.

“You need to play with confidence,” he told them. “Forget the bad plays and move on. So what, you lost a rep? That’s life. You move on and try to win the next one. You think there’s a lineman in the NFL that didn’t give up a sack? There isn’t one. It happens. You need to get back up and win the next one. I want you guys to go out there and compete and earn your draft position.”

Right after that, I asked LSU center Lloyd Cushenberry about being coached by Turner and if that’s the type of raw style he liked.

“Love it,” Cushenberry said. “He’s a good coach. Hard-nosed. That’s how I’m used to being coached.”

A little tough love seemed to be appreciated by the biggest men on the field.

As far as Turner goes, as long as he doesn't make it personal it is all good.  If a player has a problem with any of that I don't want him on my team. 

 

 

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10 hours ago, thezerawkid said:

Yeah, I just think it’s social and human progression, people are generally tired of being denigrated, regardless of the circumstances. Can’t say I’m not one of them. Fear and fire and brimstone were never effective motivators to me, even when I was a younger man. I don’t think they are all that effective anymore.

If a coach keeps it about football and not you as a person and you have a problem with it, well....that just makes you soft. 

 

Frankly, the worst thing a coach can ever do to you is ignore you.  That's when you know you are done.

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9 hours ago, UncleEarl said:

If a coach keeps it about football and not you as a person and you have a problem with it, well....that just makes you soft. 

 

Frankly, the worst thing a coach can ever do to you is ignore you.  That's when you know you are done.

Yep.  So much this.☝️

Billy Price was wandering around on the sidelines like a lost kid at the zoo looking

for his parents.

So sad.  I had high hopes for him.

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11 hours ago, UncleEarl said:

If a coach keeps it about football and not you as a person and you have a problem with it, well....that just makes you soft. 

 

Frankly, the worst thing a coach can ever do to you is ignore you.  That's when you know you are done.

100% correct. Coaches spend time on players with potential. Sometimes they need to light a fire under their ass.  Coaches will totally tune out the daisy pickers. 

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Yep.  So much this.
Billy Price was wandering around on the sidelines like a lost kid at the zoo looking
for his parents.
So sad.  I had high hopes for him.

I’m sorry that he’s had multiple line coaches with different style of play. How long has Hopkins been with the Bengals?


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100% correct. Coaches spend time on players with potential. Sometimes they need to light a fire under their ass.  Coaches will totally tune out the daisy pickers. 

Not necessarily because I had a kid on my team that was just really good and didn’t need as much attention as the others did.


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Great article. Thanks for posting.
 
The only thing that concerns me is that they are still looking at Tua. I don't want another 1st round pick, let alone a 1st pick in the draft that is coming off of injury. 

So it’s Golden Boy or nothing for you. I hope they pick Hurts number one just to piss off you Burrow bandwagon people.


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1 hour ago, Bengal_Buckeye said:


I’m sorry that he’s had multiple line coaches with different style of play. How long has Hopkins been with the Bengals?


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Unfortunately none of those coaching styles called for a terrible interior lineman, so Billy never fit in.  

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Bears got burned because they picked Trubisky instead of Mahomes or Watson. 49ers got extra picks plus the guy they wanted all along but he turned out to be Solomon Thomas. Redskins paid a lot to get RG3 and he was rookie of the year in 2012. He just got hurt and never back to full strength. Jimmie Johnson built his Cowboys team based on the Herschel Walker trade. Walker couldn't possibly live up to what was expected of him but he was a good player at the time. The Titans have benefited from trading their pick to the Eagles for Carson Wentz. 
 
Burrow is a very clean prospect. He's turned in the best season in college football history while facing a large number of good teams. He's arguably a better prospect than Andrew Luck and maybe even Peyton Manning. The knocks on Burrow are arm strength and 1 year wonder. But he's showed the ability to throw deep with touch and placement and his team's offense was revised for this season. If Brady had been around for 2018, Burrow would have no doubt put up better numbers than his actuals. So it's reasonable for teams to make Godfather type offers for Burrow. At some point, it might be reasonable for the Bengals to accept. Burrow isn't the only alternative to Dalton. 

Lay off the crack if you think he’s in comparison with Luck or Manning. You Burrow fans need a reality check. He had a good season and that’s it. It doesn’t mean he’s going to be great in the NFL.


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I watched the game. All of it. The better team won.

Really! You mean the one with the help of the officials. You need to watch it with glasses on if you can’t see. Let’s point out a few bad calls or no calls in favor of Clemson. The incomplete pass to Hill in the end zone when the Buckeyes were up 10-0. The Clemson player pulling on Hills shirt but had to kick a field goal. The same play where targeting was called and Young is getting his helmet almost ripped off his head but no hands to the face or face mask was called. Then the catch and fumble for a touchdown that was overturned. The first int that Fields threw wouldn’t have happened because the touchdown should’ve stood and it happened on the possession after the overturned call. The last int possibly wouldn’t have happened because the Buckeyes would’ve been winning.


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