Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
oldschooler

Hobson: Bengals Eye Friendly Offense; LTs think Rams scheme fits

Recommended Posts

 

 

 

 

Bengals Eye Friendly Offense

 

Hobson_Geoff

Geoff Hobson

SENIOR WRITER

 
 

Cincinnati Bengals quarterback Andy Dalton (14) congratulates wide receiver A.J. Green (18) on a touchdown catch against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers during the first half of an NFL football game in Cincinnati, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Gary Landers)

Gary Landers/AP Photos
Cincinnati Bengals quarterback Andy Dalton (14) congratulates wide receiver A.J. Green (18) on a touchdown catch against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers during the first half of an NFL football game in Cincinnati, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Gary Landers)

Now the ball is in Zac Taylor’s court.

Literally.

One of the leading reasons he became the Bengals’ 10th head coach back in February is his expertise on the offensive side of the ball with a scheme that scaled the NFL rankings when it came to points and yards. The hire is both a bow to the franchise’s foot print carved out by offensive minds like Paul Brown, Bill Walsh and Sam Wyche, as well as to the current huddle that is waiting for its talent to be tapped with the latest big thing.

“We've got a lot of good voices in the room, a lot of good perspectives,” said Dalton, who got his first look at Taylor’s playbook when the Bengals returned to work Tuesday. “I don't think there's anything that's going to happen that will be like, ‘I've never seen that before,’ ‘I've never been through that before.’ So that's a very positive thing.”

On the first day of what the Bengals hope is an offensive renaissance Dalton said he’s blessed to have three quarterbacks in the room as coaches, starting with Nebraska’s Taylor, UCLA’s Brian Callahan at offensive coordinator and Alex Van Pelt’s nine seasons backing up Jim Kelly and Drew Bledsoe returning to coach quarterbacks. But in the middle of all this QB talk, the left tackle may have had the most interesting take on the new offense when Cordy Glenn said how much liked the “O-line friendly scheme,” introduced Tuesday by Taylor and new line coach Jim Turner. 

He had his best years in West Coast schemes crafted by Jay Gruden and Hue Jackson and in the three seasons that he wasn’t in those sets, Ken Zampese and Bill Lazor stirred some of it in the brew. Dalton loves the continuity Taylor brings. He play-booked with Rams head coach Sean McVay after McVay worked under Gruden. And for half a season, Taylor was Lazor’s quarterbacks coach with the Dolphins.

“I think just the little bit that I've been able to talk to Zac about certain things,” said Dalton of the early communication, “because he was with Bill Lazor before. So he understands, 'OK, this is what you called it before,' or even with Jay Gruden, with Sean being there, 'OK, you may have called it this,' and so it's already been able to kind of translate it to exactly how we're going to do it.”

Taylor is trying is use all his connections.

“You take everything into the equation,” Taylor said. “I am familiar with how they communicated here in the past. I’ve communicated a certain way the last couple years. It’s a (marriage) of everything. We are trying to make it our own, we really are. There are a lot of things I’ve been comfortable with and that the players are comfortable with that we want to marry together.”

Rams left tackle Andrew Whitworth, who played for Taylor in Los Angeles and with Dalton in Cincinnati, knows exactly what Glenn means.

“I don’t call it so much ‘O-line friendly,’ but (it counters) what I call, ‘OC arrogance,’ Whitworth said. “You don’t have enough originality for getting the ball down the field, so you’re just going to keep sitting back there in the shot gun? If that’s happening, I can pretty much tell you your quarterback and your team is getting killed because defenses nowadays are built to get after the passer and cover and that’s it.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

“I don’t call it so much ‘O-line friendly,’ but (it counters) what I call, ‘OC arrogance,’ Whitworth said. “You don’t have enough originality for getting the ball down the field, so you’re just going to keep sitting back there in the shot gun?

 

:whistle:

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, oldschooler said:

 

 

 

 

Bengals Eye Friendly Offense

 

Hobson_Geoff

Geoff Hobson

SENIOR WRITER

 
 

Cincinnati Bengals quarterback Andy Dalton (14) congratulates wide receiver A.J. Green (18) on a touchdown catch against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers during the first half of an NFL football game in Cincinnati, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Gary Landers)

Gary Landers/AP Photos
Cincinnati Bengals quarterback Andy Dalton (14) congratulates wide receiver A.J. Green (18) on a touchdown catch against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers during the first half of an NFL football game in Cincinnati, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Gary Landers)

Now the ball is in Zac Taylor’s court.

Literally.

One of the leading reasons he became the Bengals’ 10th head coach back in February is his expertise on the offensive side of the ball with a scheme that scaled the NFL rankings when it came to points and yards. The hire is both a bow to the franchise’s foot print carved out by offensive minds like Paul Brown, Bill Walsh and Sam Wyche, as well as to the current huddle that is waiting for its talent to be tapped with the latest big thing.

“We've got a lot of good voices in the room, a lot of good perspectives,” said Dalton, who got his first look at Taylor’s playbook when the Bengals returned to work Tuesday. “I don't think there's anything that's going to happen that will be like, ‘I've never seen that before,’ ‘I've never been through that before.’ So that's a very positive thing.”

On the first day of what the Bengals hope is an offensive renaissance Dalton said he’s blessed to have three quarterbacks in the room as coaches, starting with Nebraska’s Taylor, UCLA’s Brian Callahan at offensive coordinator and Alex Van Pelt’s nine seasons backing up Jim Kelly and Drew Bledsoe returning to coach quarterbacks. But in the middle of all this QB talk, the left tackle may have had the most interesting take on the new offense when Cordy Glenn said how much liked the “O-line friendly scheme,” introduced Tuesday by Taylor and new line coach Jim Turner. 

He had his best years in West Coast schemes crafted by Jay Gruden and Hue Jackson and in the three seasons that he wasn’t in those sets, Ken Zampese and Bill Lazor stirred some of it in the brew. Dalton loves the continuity Taylor brings. He play-booked with Rams head coach Sean McVay after McVay worked under Gruden. And for half a season, Taylor was Lazor’s quarterbacks coach with the Dolphins.

“I think just the little bit that I've been able to talk to Zac about certain things,” said Dalton of the early communication, “because he was with Bill Lazor before. So he understands, 'OK, this is what you called it before,' or even with Jay Gruden, with Sean being there, 'OK, you may have called it this,' and so it's already been able to kind of translate it to exactly how we're going to do it.”

Taylor is trying is use all his connections.

“You take everything into the equation,” Taylor said. “I am familiar with how they communicated here in the past. I’ve communicated a certain way the last couple years. It’s a (marriage) of everything. We are trying to make it our own, we really are. There are a lot of things I’ve been comfortable with and that the players are comfortable with that we want to marry together.”

Rams left tackle Andrew Whitworth, who played for Taylor in Los Angeles and with Dalton in Cincinnati, knows exactly what Glenn means.

“I don’t call it so much ‘O-line friendly,’ but (it counters) what I call, ‘OC arrogance,’ Whitworth said. “You don’t have enough originality for getting the ball down the field, so you’re just going to keep sitting back there in the shot gun? If that’s happening, I can pretty much tell you your quarterback and your team is getting killed because defenses nowadays are built to get after the passer and cover and that’s it.

 

 

Jesus I could barely read this shit. I am not drunk. Maybe I had a stroke or something. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was never a fan of Hobson's style of writing, but it is becoming increasingly difficult to read. I'm sure he means well but seeing him in videos/giving interviews on the website...dude just seems like a really weird guy. Or maybe senile, who knows.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

Go-Bengals.com on Facebook

Go-Bengals.com on Twitter

×