Jump to content

Recommended Posts

23 minutes ago, Duluoz said:

The burning question is the "not real" AJ a permanent thing for the rest of the year, or is it just temporary as he shakes off the rust? I think AJ's going to see what Tyler Boyd and Tee Higgins are doing and his competitive instincts will fire up and propel him back to the "real" AJ heights that we all know. I'm expecting a big game from him against the Jags.

Maybe so.  I hope so.  This version of AJ isn't worth resigning at any price.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 357
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

*Joeggernaut Sent from my VOG-L09 using Tapatalk

Zac is on a very short leash at this point...which in Bengals terms means that he better have an 8 win season sometime in the next 5 years or so...give or take...depending on extenuating circumstances

Marty Shottenheimer!!!   Seriously,  Zimmer might be available next year.    Sorry but there is nothing that makes me believe Zac is better than Marvin.  Nothing. 

Posted Images

1 hour ago, Duluoz said:

The burning question is the "not real" AJ a permanent thing for the rest of the year, or is it just temporary as he shakes off the rust? I think AJ's going to see what Tyler Boyd and Tee Higgins are doing and his competitive instincts will fire up and propel him back to the "real" AJ heights that we all know. I'm expecting a big game from him against the Jags.

As long as he doesn't get kicked out of the game again. I guess Jalen Ramsey is no longer with Jacksonville so maybe he's safe. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

While I agree that AJ doesn't seem to be what we've seen in the past, I am going to cut him some slack...at least for now.  He's not played much football in how long now?  No preseason, very limited in training camp, etc.  Also, other teams seem to disagree that he's no longer a threat.  Philly put arguably one of the best cover CB's in the entire NFL on him all day this past Sunday.  AJ was pretty much blanketed all game from what I saw.  Maybe it was partly from AJ not being "AJ", but I also give the Philly CB a ton of credit, that dude is really good.  It would have been interesting to see if/how AJ would have responded had Philly tried to clamp down on Boyd more.  As a final point, I think some of AJ's routes take a while to develop, and with the shitshow that is our OLine, there just isn't time.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Duluoz said:

The burning question is the "not real" AJ a permanent thing for the rest of the year, or is it just temporary as he shakes off the rust? I think AJ's going to see what Tyler Boyd and Tee Higgins are doing and his competitive instincts will fire up and propel him back to the "real" AJ heights that we all know. I'm expecting a big game from him against the Jags.

Like your spirit but your reaching..

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

In a game that ends in a tie with as many chances to pull off a victory as the Bengals had on Sunday, there are dozens of individual moments, calls or drives you can point to that determine the outcome of a game.

Many of those have been refreshed across the social feeds of gluttons for punishment among the Bengals fan base over the last 36 hours.

There are two plays, though, the same play run twice which the Bengals were counting on being a success, each similarly botched in ways that you can argue either changed the game dramatically or in the case of the second time run in overtime, cost them the game.

But you might not have noticed.

The background on these two plays is the Bengals expected to see a ton of man defense from the Eagles on third down because that’s their personality. Running underneath crossers to cause congestion — or a legal pick — was a key play they wanted to use to combat it and thought could be successful.

Both ended up completions to A.J. Green short of the sticks on critical, failed third-down conversations. Each could easily have put points on the board, in the case of OT, game-winning points.

Here’s what happened.

The first situation was third-and-7 on the second Cincinnati drive of the game coming at their own 47 immediately after the interception by Logan Wilson. Significant momentum at stake.

The play design is contingent on tight end Drew Sample setting the depth of Green sprinting across and forcing his defender to go over the top of the mesh of bodies at midfield. Then, theoretically, Green would catch the ball and turn into open space for a big gain into Eagles territory, or at least a first down.

Instead, as Green came across covered by 2016 undrafted free agent corner Cre’Von LeBlanc, Sample sets up too high and LeBlanc undercuts with Green and tackles the Bengals receiver right as he catches it, two yards shy of the first down.

“Drew Sample has got to help set the depth and the pick as A.J. comes across,” offensive coordinator Brian Callahan said. “The technique they play on the bunch on the other side lended them to a little bit of an advantage. But Drew was too deep. Drew has to come flatter. He has to make the defender go over the top of him and A.J. catches that ball out the backside and probably runs for about 20.”

 

It’s third-and-4 from the 43 and this time with press coverage, it opens up an opportunity to take advantage of the rule where receivers can make contact within a yard of the line of scrimmage. This time, the job is on Auden Tate to take out the crosser as Green sprints across Joe Burrow’s face.

The cross point comes and Tate is right there to basically take him out or collide at the 43. Tate instead throws his hands up to actually avoid any contact on Darius Slay. 

Slay is then right there and Green goes nowhere on the reception.

“In that particular instance, we’re trying to contact the defender because he’s pressed and the depth would allow him to contact the defender legally inside of one yard,” Callahan said. “We missed the contact. The defender runs underneath. Had we got the pick we wanted to get on that particular play, A.J. probably runs for another 20 or 30 yards after the pick. Those are execution things that we didn’t get done in third-down spots. I thought ultimately our third-down failures yesterday was probably what ended up losing us that game. Or tying it.”

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, I_C_Deadpeople said:

In a game that ends in a tie with as many chances to pull off a victory as the Bengals had on Sunday, there are dozens of individual moments, calls or drives you can point to that determine the outcome of a game.

Many of those have been refreshed across the social feeds of gluttons for punishment among the Bengals fan base over the last 36 hours.

There are two plays, though, the same play run twice which the Bengals were counting on being a success, each similarly botched in ways that you can argue either changed the game dramatically or in the case of the second time run in overtime, cost them the game.

But you might not have noticed.

The background on these two plays is the Bengals expected to see a ton of man defense from the Eagles on third down because that’s their personality. Running underneath crossers to cause congestion — or a legal pick — was a key play they wanted to use to combat it and thought could be successful.

Both ended up completions to A.J. Green short of the sticks on critical, failed third-down conversations. Each could easily have put points on the board, in the case of OT, game-winning points.

Here’s what happened.

The first situation was third-and-7 on the second Cincinnati drive of the game coming at their own 47 immediately after the interception by Logan Wilson. Significant momentum at stake.

The play design is contingent on tight end Drew Sample setting the depth of Green sprinting across and forcing his defender to go over the top of the mesh of bodies at midfield. Then, theoretically, Green would catch the ball and turn into open space for a big gain into Eagles territory, or at least a first down.

Instead, as Green came across covered by 2016 undrafted free agent corner Cre’Von LeBlanc, Sample sets up too high and LeBlanc undercuts with Green and tackles the Bengals receiver right as he catches it, two yards shy of the first down.

“Drew Sample has got to help set the depth and the pick as A.J. comes across,” offensive coordinator Brian Callahan said. “The technique they play on the bunch on the other side lended them to a little bit of an advantage. But Drew was too deep. Drew has to come flatter. He has to make the defender go over the top of him and A.J. catches that ball out the backside and probably runs for about 20.”

 

It’s third-and-4 from the 43 and this time with press coverage, it opens up an opportunity to take advantage of the rule where receivers can make contact within a yard of the line of scrimmage. This time, the job is on Auden Tate to take out the crosser as Green sprints across Joe Burrow’s face.

The cross point comes and Tate is right there to basically take him out or collide at the 43. Tate instead throws his hands up to actually avoid any contact on Darius Slay. 

Slay is then right there and Green goes nowhere on the reception.

“In that particular instance, we’re trying to contact the defender because he’s pressed and the depth would allow him to contact the defender legally inside of one yard,” Callahan said. “We missed the contact. The defender runs underneath. Had we got the pick we wanted to get on that particular play, A.J. probably runs for another 20 or 30 yards after the pick. Those are execution things that we didn’t get done in third-down spots. I thought ultimately our third-down failures yesterday was probably what ended up losing us that game. Or tying it.”

 

 

The play with Tate could have been he was a tick to late and would have been oenaluzed for illegal block so he tgrew his hands up to avoid it..

Bottom line is AJ looks slow now..

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Year after year we have these losses that come down to one missed play or another. This is coaching, the best teams make plays they don't miss plays. They minimize mistakes, especially in crunch time. This team it is always 'we have to work on our execution'; 'we were just one or two plays away' ' we have to not make a mistake in that situation', etc. 

 

Always excuses with the promise of ' we will work on that' . Rinse and repeat, groundhog day. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, I_C_Deadpeople said:

Year after year we have these losses that come down to one missed play or another. This is coaching, the best teams make plays they don't miss plays. They minimize mistakes, especially in crunch time. This team it is always 'we have to work on our execution'; 'we were just one or two plays away' ' we have to not make a mistake in that situation', etc. 

 

Always excuses with the promise of ' we will work on that' . Rinse and repeat, groundhog day. 

Truth.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...