Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
Le Tigre

Draft/OTA's/Training Camp/Season Covid-19

Recommended Posts

6 hours ago, UncleEarl said:

Herbstreit, along with damn near everyone else, has made a decision on how this virus thing is going to play out and is basing his thoughts on that.  The reality is that we don't really know.  Multiple "experts" say something different every day.  Best to keep your mouth shut and not look stupid down the road. 

Oh I dont know about all that.   I just know Centerville Elk alumni, other than my sister, are slack jawed goat fuckers. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, SF2 said:

Oh I dont know about all that.   I just know Centerville Elk alumni, other than my sister, are slack jawed goat fuckers. 

Glad you didnt count your sister lol.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, claptonrocks said:

Glad you didnt count your sister lol.

 

Well, my brother in law is more like a bear, not a goat. And he is a Butler High School graduate   Ok, not sure if that is better or not.  Nevermind, screw the ELKS!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/27/2020 at 3:48 PM, Le Tigre said:

Herbie says:

 

https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2883351-espns-kirk-herbstreit-will-be-shocked-if-nfl-college-football-play-season

 

ESPN analyst Kirk Herbstreit said Thursday he'd be "shocked" if the 2020 NFL or college football seasons take place because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Herbstreit discussed the potential of all football being canceled this year during an appearance on ESPN Radio (via TMZ Sports).

"I'll be shocked if we have NFL football this fall, if we have college football. I'll be so surprised if that happens," he said. "Just because, from what I understand, people that I listen to, you're 12 to 18 months from a [COVID-19] vaccine. I don't know how you let these guys go into locker rooms and let stadiums be filled up and how you can play ball. I just don't know how you can do it with the optics of it."

 

Herbstreit said if he was in charge of either the NFL or the NCAA, he'd already be set to announce the football season was being canceled, per TMZ.

"Next thing you know you got a locker room full of guys that are sick. And that's on your watch? I wouldn't want to have that," he said. "As much as I hate to say it, I think we're scratching the surface of where this thing's gonna go."

He added the limited preparation time would also be a factor, even if the coronavirus outlook started to improve by late summer: "You don't all of the sudden come up with something in July or August and say, 'OK we're good to go' and turn 'em loose!"

 

 

Damn, didn't know Herbie went to med school and became a doctor. 

I should pay better attention.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, Jupiter Fan said:

Damn, didn't know Herbie went to med school and became a doctor. 

I should pay better attention.

 

The stay-at-home directive serves to “flatten the curve” so that healthcare facilities and workers are not over-whelmed at any one point in time.  It also gives more time to determine the more effective treatments and for development of a vaccine before a much larger number of people become infected.     The down-side of “flattening the curve” is that the spread of the virus will be taking much, much longer.   It is not unreasonable to expect the shutdowns to continue into winter.  

 

I am personally hopeful that we’ll be close to being back to almost normal by the end of the summer, but I believe that to be very optimistic.  I think that the most critical factor will be the development, manufacture, and distribution of the vaccine.  The last estimates that I heard put that at nine to twelve months away.  Hopefully there is an unexpected breakthrough that will facilitate a quicker end to the outbreak.

 

[Full disclosure:  I am no doctor, but I did once stay at a Holiday Inn Express.]

 

🦗

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Herbie's medical/scientific qualifications aside, two observations in his statements might lead one to consider reasons as to why the football seasons--both NFL and collegiate--might be shortened at best or cancelled at worst:

 

Practices (OTA's, Training Camps, In-season):

 

Large groupings of athletes and staff, in close proximity to each other, in all weather conditions. Even in non-pandemic environments, one bug has been known to lay low considerable portions of teams. Since no treatments or vaccines have been developed for this one yet, the chances for exposure increases. 

 

In-Stadium Attendance:

 

Much like above--at an exponential increase of likelihood--putting tens of thousands of people together in one place, may be risks beyond calculation. And not simply for the attendees, but also people they contact with afterwards. This will already effect the likelihood of the baseball season ever getting off the ground in 2020.

 

One other question (out of many):

 

State and local restrictions: not every one is going to lift stay-in-place or social distancing parameters at the same time. 

 

One thing may lead to another...who knows when it stops? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting article. Many points to consider. 
 

However, in the context of continuing the NFL’s hopes for a 2020 season, the prevailing influence will still be made by medical and associated governmental enitities. And, these will not primarily be made at federal levels—rather at the individual state and local ones. 
 

I am seeing a trend where it may be impossible for the NFL—or any of the sports, college included—to overcome different state/ local splintered medical/governmental mandates into a one size fits all cohesion for “business as usual”. 
 

Who knows? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Le Tigre said:


 

However, in the context of continuing the NFL’s hopes for a 2020 season, the prevailing influence will still be made by medical and associated governmental enitities. And, these will not primarily be made at federal levels—rather at the individual state and local ones. 
 

I am seeing a trend where it may be impossible for the NFL—or any of the sports, college included—to overcome different state/ local splintered medical/governmental mandates into a one size fits all cohesion for “business as usual”. 
 

Who knows? 

Nobody is even mentioning traveling from city to city and that hotspots are breaking out in different parts of the country at different times. Would you want a team from New York or New Orleans coming into Cincinnati right now?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

2 hours ago, Shebengal said:

Nobody is even mentioning traveling from city to city and that hotspots are breaking out in different parts of the country at different times. Would you want a team from New York or New Orleans coming into Cincinnati right now?

This is one of the “prongs” MLB and the players union mutually agreed to recently. Any approved games (in any city) would necessitate approval of the municipality involved. 
 

How in the world would  this herding of cats happen uniformly? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not think we will know for sure how bad it really was in Wuhan or how much it has improved either.

 

It will take a while for folks to start feeling comfortable in crowds of unknown people.  Sporting events might open the doors but how many will actually come thru the gates?

Can you imagine what happens after you take your seat and someone next to you coughs or sneezes?

 

Regardless of what the government says it will be just like Jaws.  They said it was safe at Amity Island and while everyone went to the beach no one was going in the water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another take, from the view of NCAA Football's 2020 season (but can also include the NFL):

 

How in jeopardy is the 2020 college football season?

From medical experts to veteran college football voices, there are cases to be made for canceling or altering the season as COVID-19 questions abound.

By Dick Harmon, Columnist@Harmonwrites  Apr 1, 2020, 9:59pm MDT
 

FOR DIRK FACER CROWD STORY High attendance as the University of Utah defeats Colorado State University 49-16 in Mountain West Conference NCAA football in Salt Lake City, Utah, Oct. 18, 2008. Photo by Tom Smart Fans cheer during Utah football game against Colorado State. What will football stadiums look like this fall? Players with fans? Players but no fans? No fans and no players? Time will tell.  Tom Smart, Deseret News

 

Will 2020 be the year without a college football season?

Unfortunately, the way things are going, it might be where we’re headed.

At the least, there could be adjustments in schedules, seating, or even no crowds.

This isn’t meant to be a Debbie Downer examination, but there are golf courses empty right now when they’ve got hundreds of acres to spread a gaggle of golfers across fairways and greens. Stopping golf?

“I’d say 25% chance there are no games played, 25% chance it’s business as usual, and 50% chance that it is delayed or interrupted,” Jon Wilner

On Wednesday, England canceled Wimbledon. The stadiums used for Wimbledon are nothing like the seats that cram bodies into mega stadiums in the United States. Take a place like Michigan’s Big House, any school in the SEC and even high school stadiums in Texas and they beat Wimbledon by a factor of about a trillion.

Well, that’s an exaggeration. But the point is taken. Social distancing and the interpretations of exactly what that means is now leading some cities and states to threaten citations, fines and even jail time if people hang out.

Can things really change that much in a few months when football practice is scheduled to begin and there’s been no spring practice or time for players to prepare for the game? Heck, wasn’t it just a few weeks ago people were in overcrowded bars in New York and New Orleans partying like nothing’s happened?

Now we’re wearing masks at Home Depot, keeping 6 feet away from others.

I asked CBSsports.com national college football expert Dennis Dodd what he thought the chances were that the college football season would be canceled.

His response?

“I’ve been putting it at 40/60 against (4 out of 10?). Too many logistical hoops to jump through right now. It is hard to envision there not being any positives IF camp opens on time. Putting 100 people in a room goes against everything we know right now. Plus it’s hard to play football if school isn’t even open. That said, administrators are desperate for that TV money.”

I also reached out to Jon Wilner of the San Jose Mercury News, an award-winning college sports expert who covers the Pac-12, with the same question. He was more optimistic.

“I’d say 25% chance there are no games played, 25% chance it’s business as usual, and 50% chance that it is delayed or interrupted,” said Wilner.

“The schools and the networks will exhaust every option — even if it means playing on Tuesdays and starting in November. There is too much at stake. They will be as creative as is humanly possible,” said the Bay Area journalist.

 

In my guess, it is 50-50.

 

But this is the biggest crapshoot ever.

 

By September, folks may not be able to afford a football ticket, a gallon of milk, or stadium popcorn.

 

“I’ll be shocked if we have NFL football this fall, if we have college football. I’ll be so surprised if that happens.” — Kirk Herbstreit

ESPN’s chief college football analyst Kirk Herbstreit went on the radio the other day with a stark warning for all college football fans.

“I’ll be shocked if we have NFL football this fall, if we have college football. I’ll be so surprised if that happens,” he said through TMZ. “Just because from what I understand, people that I listen to, you’re 12 to 18 months from a (coronavirus) vaccine. I don’t know how you let these guys go into locker rooms and let stadiums be filled up and how you can play ball. I just don’t know how you can do it with the optics of it.”

The benefits, like the economy, are huge. TV revenue, ticket sales, sponsorships, corporate partnerships, community togetherness, feeding fans what they need and crave, providing psychological jet fuel to the masses.

These are media takes.

 

For the medical folks, just tune in and listen to what they say. They’re adjusting their daily reports as fast as they can. They don’t know.

 

Nobody knows.

 

The stark truth to just playing on is this: What public official in city, county, state, federal government is going to give the “all clear” order if this thing continues through the summer, which it might likely do?

 

What athletic trainer or doctor is going to advise a coach to put players on the field if they haven’t properly trained and are at risk of this virus?

 

Who is going to open the gates for mass gatherings come the first of September unless there is absolutely no chance of a second wave and there is no vaccine? Who is that person?

The new normal has not even hit us before our old tax day arrives on April 15 and we aren’t even managing it very well with guidelines, warnings, edicts and quarantines being ignored by many.

 

Defending national champion LSU coach Ed Orgeron told the media this week he is optimistic that there will be a college football season this year.

 

But here’s the big rub, and we’ve already seen it with some sports like the PGA Tour, where players have refused to play. It might all come down to an NFL or college football player or two refusing to play. If that happens, it will not be the decision of the president, governor or mayor. It will be the pawns in the matrix simply shutting it down.

 

Remember what happened earlier this month when we were all gearing up for March Madness with plane tickets bought and hotel reservations on the brink of being signed.

All it took was Utah Jazz player Rudy Gobert testing positive for COVID-19 in Oklahoma City and the entire NBA shut down within hours. Then it was a domino effect like we’ve never seen before across every sport and every major event we know from the Masters to spring football and even bingo at the old folks home.

 

Beware.

 

This is far from over. Prepare your minds and hearts.

 

And be sure Netflix is working.

 

https://www.deseret.com/sports/2020/4/1/21202237/college-football-jon-wilner-dennis-dodd-wimbledon-covid-19-byu-utah-utah-state-pac-12-ncaa-football

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Obviously way ahead of myself, but assuming worst case and there is no NFL season this year I would assume the Bengals would be selecting #1 overall again?  Or do they go make an exception and go some sort of a lottery system...?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Dautcom08 said:

Obviously way ahead of myself, but assuming worst case and there is no NFL season this year I would assume the Bengals would be selecting #1 overall again?  Or do they go make an exception and go some sort of a lottery system...?

We can only dream...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, I_C_Deadpeople said:

If there was no NFL season there will also be no college season so it would just be a giant mess 

If we were to get pick one again can you imagine the trade offers for Trevor Lawrence!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, claptonrocks said:

If we were to get pick one again can you imagine the trade offers for Trevor Lawrence!!!

But if they did not play a college season he would not be eligible for the draft. 

 

I don't think anyone has thought that far ahead....but if there was no college season then there would be no additional players available other then those that would simply declare. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, I_C_Deadpeople said:

But if they did not play a college season he would not be eligible for the draft. 

 

I don't think anyone has thought that far ahead....but if there was no college season then there would be no additional players available other then those that would simply declare. 

Deadpeople thought ahead....but yeah your right...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even if the 2020 season is canceled, Trevor Lawrence would be eligible for the 2021 draft. He'd be 3 years out of high school by then. He doesn't have to play 3 seasons in college. 

 

If the 2020 NFL season were canceled, teams might not sign their rookies since NFL contracts have to be paid even if there are no games. Unlike the NBA, the NFL CBA doesn't have a force majeure clause. The rights to rookies last until the next draft so players might be signed next year. Presumably teams would be allowed 90 man offseason rosters with no cutdown dates. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AFAIK, or can find, the only American major league to cancel a season before it started, was the NHL 2004-2005 season. It appears that all standings at the end of the 2003-2004 season froze in place to when it picked up in 2005-2006.

 

The players selected in the 2004 Entry Draft, were permitted to sign and be on the rosters for the ill-fated 2004-2005 year. 

 

The subsequent Entry Draft in 2005, was not based on team position in 2004. Rather, it was formatted in lottery-style. The Penguins won the lottery, and selected Sidney Crosby. 

 

The Stanley Cup was unawarded for the first time that year. It is engraved on the Cup as "Season Not Played" 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Le Tigre said:

AFAIK, or can find, the only American major league to cancel a season before it started, was the NHL 2004-2005 season. It appears that all standings at the end of the 2003-2004 season froze in place to when it picked up in 2005-2006.

 

The players selected in the 2004 Entry Draft, were permitted to sign and be on the rosters for the ill-fated 2004-2005 year. 

 

The subsequent Entry Draft in 2005, was not based on team position in 2004. Rather, it was formatted in lottery-style. The Penguins won the lottery, and selected Sidney Crosby. 

 

The Stanley Cup was unawarded for the first time that year. It is engraved on the Cup as "Season Not Played" 

About the lottery pick By having the worst record we d have the most balls or whatever they use..

Hell we d stand a damn good chance at number one pick again!!

GOD can't be that good can he?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, sparky151 said:

Even if the 2020 season is canceled, Trevor Lawrence would be eligible for the 2021 draft. He'd be 3 years out of high school by then. He doesn't have to play 3 seasons in college. 

 

If the 2020 NFL season were canceled, teams might not sign their rookies since NFL contracts have to be paid even if there are no games. Unlike the NBA, the NFL CBA doesn't have a force majeure clause. The rights to rookies last until the next draft so players might be signed next year. Presumably teams would be allowed 90 man offseason rosters with no cutdown dates. 

Good point, I thought it was 3 years in college 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, High School Harry said:

Ben Rapeherburger spent three years in second grade.

I truly believe his talent is gone..

The mobility wont be there at his age and weight..

Wouldnt surprise me to see Tomlin finally have a losing record this year...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, claptonrocks said:

About the lottery pick By having the worst record we d have the most balls or whatever they use..

Hell we d stand a damn good chance at number one pick again!!

GOD can't be that good can he?

Ironically, the Pens finished with the worst record in 2003-2004, and had the first pick. They picked a very good goaltender, Marc-Andre Flury

 

In the 2005 lottery, teams were weighted based on playoff appearances for the previous 3 full seasons, and first overall draft picks in the previous 4 drafts. There were 3 ping pong balls assigned to 4 teams which didn't make other playoffs and didn't get any #1 overalls. Pens won again...and took the coveted Crosby. There was a wide-spread conspiracy theory that the league weighted the lottery in favor of the Pens, so that they would set up a rivalry between them and the Ovechkin-led Caps. It did work out that way.

 

The Penguins went on to win the Cup 4 years later, so there's that. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...