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4 hours ago, New Jersey Bengal said:

Dennis weathersby don’t think he passed but got in a bad accident 


I was going to say, no, he was shot…not in a car accident.  But my mind was also telling me “car accident”…so I looked online.
 

First, he was shot…and later was in a car accident which put him in a coma.  
 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dennis_Weathersby

 

[That’s Wikipedia, so some “facts” might be off.]

 

One thing I do remember is that after the car accident, the Bengals went ahead and paid his salary for the season, even though they didn’t have to.  Kinda goes against the “Bengals are cheap” narrative that we have often heard.

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Lawsuit filed by 23rd plaintiff details three different encounters with Deshaun Watson

Posted by Mike Florio on June 1, 2022, 12:02 PM EDT
 

On Tuesday, a 23rd lawsuit was filed against Browns quarterback Deshaun Watson. The complaint, a copy of which PFT has obtained and reviewed, details three different incidents involving the plaintiff, Nia Smith, and Watson.
 

Smith, who went public last August in a podcast appearance with her contentions against Watson, explains in the lawsuit that she previously “did not want to put herself and her family through the turmoil of a long, drawn out public lawsuit.” She also contends that the received “death threats” after he name “found its way into the public sphere.”

 

“She did not want to subject herself to further abuse and ugliness she has seen thrown at other victims by the Watson defense team, public relations team and Watson’s fanatics,” the document contends at page 2.

 

Smith “changed her mind” after seeing last week’s item on HBO’s Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel; she claims she “was struck by the courage of the victims willing to step forward and speak, and was extremely displeased by Watson and his legal team’s mistreatment and revictimization of the Plaintiffs.”

 

The lawsuit contends that Smith had encounters with Watson on June 7, 2020, August 24, 2020, and in early September 2020. She claims that his “behavior grew worse during every massage.”

 

For the first incident, Watson allegedly asked that only the plaintiff be in the room. Watson (per the complaint) “kept demanding Plaintiff to go inside of his anus.” The complaint acknowledges that the plaintiff was not offended by the request, that she did not comply with it, and that she “decided to give Watson the benefit of the doubt as she thought that maybe he was ashamed and embarrassed of this fetish.”

 

For the second massage, the plaintiff contends that Watson asked her to wear a sundress. The plaintiff did not comply with the request. From the complaint: “Watson’s behavior escalated during the second session. He would try to grab Plaintiff’s buttocks and would brush up against her butt, trying to make it look like an accident. Plaintiff pushed his hand away from her. Every time she did that, Watson would say ‘What?’ Watson knew that Plaintiff was uncomfortable. He kept asking Plaintiff if she wanted his penis in her mouth. Plaintiff was feeling extremely uncomfortable by this point, but she wanted to stay professional and not cause any conflict. Watson was much bigger and much stronger, and they were alone in a room. She was deathly afraid of what he would do if she reprimanded him.”

 

The plaintiff did not want to do the third massage. She contends that she was pressured by her boss to do it. From the complaint, as to the third massage: “He repeatedly requested that Plaintiff have sex with him. He told Plaintiff he had a condom in his bag. He touched Plaintiff in between her legs. She had to massage him from a distance as a way to avoid his groping. When the massage was over, she decided to quit her job at the salon.”

 

Although the complaint includes no allegations against Smith’s supervisor or the salon, Smith contends that her boss “facilitated massages for Watson and knew Watson was attempting to have sex with them.”

 

It’s not entirely clear what Smith hopes to obtain in the way of financial compensation. At the top of page 3, the complaint says this: “She brings this case seeking minimum compensation, but to obtain a court finding that Watson’s conduct was wrong.” At page 11, however, the complaint says this: “Plaintiff seeks any and all damages to which she may be entitled. As stated, Plaintiff also seeks exemplary damages to deter such conduct going forward, and to make an example of this Defendant.”

 

She has every right to seek full compensation from Watson, if she can provide that he engaged in actionable misconduct. She also has apparent rights against her former supervisor and the salon at which she worked, if she chooses to pursue those rights.
 

Watson has denied all wrongdoing, in this case and in the other 22 pending cases.

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On 5/28/2022 at 7:48 AM, membengal said:

I take chase over hopkins 100 times out of 100.

 

Agreed. Hopkins is getting up there in age and the injuries seem to be coming. 

 

Kupp and Adams are legit.  Chase should be #3.

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21 hours ago, Cricket said:


I was going to say, no, he was shot…not in a car accident.  But my mind was also telling me “car accident”…so I looked online.
 

First, he was shot…and later was in a car accident which put him in a coma.  
 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dennis_Weathersby

 

[That’s Wikipedia, so some “facts” might be off.]

 

One thing I do remember is that after the car accident, the Bengals went ahead and paid his salary for the season, even though they didn’t have to.  Kinda goes against the “Bengals are cheap” narrative that we have often heard.

Yes I remember was shot in a drive by in California and think he got in the accident here

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43 minutes ago, sparky151 said:

Guess Tuitt didn't want to play a final season with Tomlin's first losing record.

 

So Watson's accuser went back again and again? But claims he mistreated her repeatedly? Hmm. 

The odd thing I have noticed with all 23 “filings”, is that no media has shown copies of the complaints—which should be public record in Harris County TX. The only one I have seen, is the front page of Complainant 22, which shows “Jane Doe” as the plaintiff vs Watson. Not much else.
 

The allegations cited are from the 4-corners of  the plaintiffs’ filings—naturally one-sided. But to have admissions against interest in the complaint itself? Hmmm..

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4 hours ago, sparky151 said:

Guess Tuitt didn't want to play a final season with Tomlin's first losing record.

 

So Watson's accuser went back again and again? But claims he mistreated her repeatedly? Hmm. 

The plaintiff did not want to do the third massage. She contends that she was pressured by her boss to do it. From the complaint, as to the third massage: “He repeatedly requested that Plaintiff have sex with him. He told Plaintiff he had a condom in his bag. He touched Plaintiff in between her legs. She had to massage him from a distance as a way to avoid his groping. When the massage was over, she decided to quit her job at the salon.”

 

it seems it was bad enough,  she quit her job over it. but  i guess thats not good enough for you?

IMO 2-3 or even 5,  maybe its honest mistakes or things taken different then was intended , but after 20 you have to think maybe there is something to it.   

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There is that, of course. It is, however, coming from the plaintiff’s allegation. We are also seeing snippets of a legal complaint being relayed by media outlets. It would be better if we could read the complaint itself. 
 

I have numerous questions, just a few here:

There are 22 other plaintiffs—each with their own individual causes of action. What do these complaints allege? Are there similarities to those of Plaintiff 23? 
 

Why is the employer not a party defendant? If they knew or should have known of the acts being done—and did nothing—they would be vicariously liable also. 


There are strategies used in the development of civil litigation. This should be interesting. One thing is for certain however: not one of these cases will ever go to trial. They will all settle long before that. Watson will be paying, I suspect, virtually all of that signing bonus he received. I read somewhere that the estimates for total settlement amounts for all 23 will be somewhere in the $30-$50 million range. 

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Eighteen of the then 22 complainants were willing to settle last year for $100K. Maybe they want more now with Watson having a bigger contract but they may not get it. The standard for a jury in a civil trial is preponderance of the evidence, ie a 50.1% chance. The standard for indictment in a criminal case is probable cause, ie a 50.1% chance. We don't know how hard the prosecutors in Harris and Brazos county tried to get an indictment. Usually if they want one, they can have it. But the grand juries didn't find the complaining witnesses persuasive.

 

Three of the plaintiffs worked for Dionne Louis at a massage parlor. They are basically alleging she is a madam, yet not suing her. She may have dirt on them, to establish they are sex workers. 

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